• The Architecture Profession and the Public: Leopold Eidlitz's "Discourses between Two T-Squares"

    Author(s):
    Kathryn Holliday (see profile)
    Date:
    2007
    Subject(s):
    Architecture, Modern, Architectural design, Art, American
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Architectural theory, Professionalization
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/dw8w-we16
    Abstract:
    Since the beginnings of professionalization in the nineteenth century, architects have struggled to find ways to reach a broad public. Leopold Eidlitz, one of the founding members of the American Institute of Architects, published a series of essays in The Crayon in 1858 that attempted, through the use of popular literary forms, to do just that. Eidlitz addressed the "Discourses Between Two T-Squares" to a general audience and hoped that their humor and scathing caricatures would educate non-professionals about the practical and theoretical intricacies of architecture. Eidlitz's attempt at advocacy sheds light on the long-standing difficulty that architects have faced in their attempts to create a resonant public image.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    11 months ago
    License:
    Attribution

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