• Hiding from History, Introduction, ch 3

    Author(s):
    Meili Steele (see profile)
    Date:
    2005
    Group(s):
    Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Historiography, Literary theory, Philosophy, Political Philosophy & Theory
    Subject(s):
    Political science--Philosophy
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Political philosophy, Literary theory
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/mxem-s438
    Abstract:
    This book challenges an assumption at the heart of contemporary theoretical debates: that it is impossible to reason through history. Steele believes that two influential schools of contemporary thought “hide from history”: liberal philosophies of public reason as espoused by such figures as Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls and Martha Nussbaum and structuralist/poststructuralist thought as practiced by Hayden White, Judith Butler, and Michel Foucault. All reasoning depends on its historical inheritance, a public imagination, through and against which it must articulate itself. After making a philosophical argument for this conception, Steele illustrates how this idea works by looking at debates over the display Confederate Flag, Hannah Arendt’s exchange with Ralph Ellison over school desegregation in Little Rock; the German Historians’ Debate over how to tell the story of the Holocaust; and arguments over “the clash of civilizations” as expressed by Samuel Huntington, Edward Said, Amartya Sen, and Edward Said. Hiding from History boldly outlines new territory for literary and political theory.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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